What can you see in Europe

Expats advices to select the top travel destinations in Europe. What is this longing and why does it encompass us? Whether we are young or old, rich or poor, cultivated or under-cultivated, single or family – this longing encompasses all of us. Longing for a shower is an ancient phenomenon. For a long time religious pilgrimages were perceived as genuine journeys, made with great sacrifices by ordinary people, while educational journeys addressed people in the upper strata of society. Today almost anyone can get on the road. And travel is perceived especially as an enrichment, a healing, something that cultivates you, rests you, strengthens your character, broadens your sphere of knowledge, something with positive effects.

Lucerne – Pilatus: Mount Pilatus is one of the most legendary mountain massif located in Lucerne, Switzerland. A massif is a mountain made of several peaks rather than one zenith. To reach the top consider a ride along the Pilatus Railway, which is the steepest cogwheel railway on the planet. Madrid – Plaza Mayor: The Plaza Mayor was built in the 15th century in the center of Madrid, Spain. Today the central plaza with its Baroque architecture is highly popular among tourists and shoppers alike.

Palace of Versailles – Versailles, France: This royal chateau is located in Versailles in the Ile-de-France region and the palace is sometimes referred to simply as ‘Versailles’. Versailles was just a small village community when the palace was built in the 11th-century, unlike the thriving, affluent town it has become. From 1682, it was the seat of political power for the Kingdom of France. Louis Le Vaue was the architect responsible for the expansion of the palace from 1661 under the orders of Louis XIV. This building has been part of many significant historical events throughout French history. The palace is now only used as a museum and has become one of the most popular tourist attractions in France.

Expats in Europe tip of the day : Unless it’s Spanish and you took it in college, ’cause then it’ll probably be easy. But if not, make an effort to at least learn the basics immediately; people will be a lot friendlier if you show an interest in their native tongue, and it will help ease everyday interactions. And remember, every country has its own sayings and slang — there’s bound to be some miscommunication, even if you’ve spoken the language for a long time. Read more details on We Be Trippin.

Mingle with other expats. While you don’t want your whole social circle to be those who have migrated from other countries, it’s often helpful to have individuals who are going through the same situation as you around. Additionally, these individuals may be able to offer great insight on where to find good international services like international health insurance.